What’s the Word?In Washington County, Oregon

Posts Tagged ‘Tualatin’

What is the Tualatin Valley?

Posted on: August 6th, 2014 by Jackie Luskey No Comments
Oregon's Washington County is the Tualatin Valley (and we're proud of it!).

Oregon’s Washington County is the Tualatin Valley (and we’re proud of it!).

What is the Tualatin Valley?

Geographically speaking, the Tualatin River runs through the Tualatin Valley with the Tualatin Mountains creating a north and east border for the region. In fact, the Tualatin Mountains are part of the  Northern Oregon Coast Range, which create that tickle of cool Coastal Range air that visitors love while enjoying the Tualatin Valley Scenic Bikeway  and Vineyard and Valley Scenic Tour Route. The Tualatin Valley is lucky enough to be a part of the Northern Willamette Valley and the northern part of the Chehalem Mountains, which makes for rich soil and diverse winemaking opportunities (which our winemakers fully embrace and celebrate). The Tualatin Valley encompasses the towns and cities of Aloha, Banks, Beaverton, Cornelius, Hillsboro, Sherwood, Tigard and Tualatin. Plainly put, the Tualatin Valley is Oregon’s Washington County.

Historically speaking, the Tualatin Valley is grounded by the Native Americans and Oregon Pioneers who first called this fertile land home. The regions namesake comes from the hunting-and-gathering Atfalati tribe of the Kalapuya Native Americans who lived in villages peppered throughout the valley.  The community is also known as Tualatin Native Americans. In the mid-19th Century, Oregon Pioneers came to the land and began calling it the “Twality Plains,” which had a similar mouth feel to the name of the Atfalati tribe. Over the years, Twality Plains has evolved into the name of the Tualatin Valley. Today, whether you hear the Twality Plains, Northern Willamette Valley or Oregon’s Washington County, know that all of these monikers are synonyms for the Tualatin Valley.

Poetically speaking, the Tualatin Valley is breathtaking greenery intersected by large stretches of vibrant farmland. It is the cool Coastal Range air creating soft, whispering breezes between the tombstones of Oregon Pioneers. It is the taste of juicy summer berries and the best Oregon Pinot wine. The Tualatin Valley is zip-lines through beautiful treetops and vineyard vines reaching their roots deep down into volcanic soil.

So, what is the Tualatin Valley? Quite simply, the Tualatin Valley is us. And we can’t wait to share the magic of all that is here with you.

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Five Great Places for Outdoor Dining

Posted on: July 14th, 2014 by Jackie Luskey No Comments
Fact: this sandwich tastes even better on the patio at Hayden's Lakefront Grill

Fact: this sandwich tastes even better on the patio at Hayden’s Lakefront Grill

In Italian, “al fresco” means in the cool air. Yes, the cool air after the high heat of the day has passed and a refreshing evening breeze begins.  Dining al fresco is one of the simple joys of summer, encouraging leisurely dinners among friends. Check out a sampling of our favorite outdoor dining options:

Fireside
The Fireside Grill adds spark back into dinner time with fire pits in the middle of their patio tables. Try “The Portlander” burger: a vegan patty on a gluten free bun with hummus, served with a salad dressed in lemon chia seed vinaigrette. All that’s left is to put a bird on it!

Lake Sunsets
Hayden’s Lakefront Grill is situated along Tualatin’s Lake of the Commons, where the lake mirrors the sky’s peachy pinks and periwinkle blues. The evening is heightened by calamari and risotto cakes, followed by a lux slumber at Century Hotel.

Beer Garden
McMenamins Raleigh Hills Pub brings Bavarian summer traditions to the Tualatin Valley with a lovely outdoor beer garden. The garden sits adjacent to the pub and its pyramid-style roof, which looks just as impressive from outside as from within.

Vineyard Views
Ponzi Vineyards Winery shows how al fresco dining only requires a nibble, so long as there is good wine. The tasting room’s patio sits atop a Chehalem Mountains slope, providing sweeping views lush farmland. The antipasti plate makes for a great patio snack.

Treehouse Experience
Tree’s Restaurant lives up to its namesake as every seat has views of gorgeous greenery.  While you can sit outside with the patio heater, the al fresco lifestyle is brought indoors with large windows and thoughtful tree artwork. So settle in and enjoy the Italian-Creole fusion cuisine, including shrimp with Parmesan grits.

Farm-to-Table Events
For a truly extraordinary al fresco dining experience, sign up for a farm-to-table dinner!

Farm to Table Dinner at Nana Cardoon Farms
July 19 | 6 p.m. |$75 per person

Our Table in the Field Dinner
August 9 | 4:30 p.m. |$85 per person

Farm to Table: Celebrating Hillsboro’s Agricultural Heritage
August 22 | 5:30 p.m. |$75 per person  

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Oregon’s Washington County After Dark

Posted on: November 4th, 2013 by Jackie Luskey No Comments
The new shop-until-you-drop: Shop at Bridgeport Village until you drop into your luxurious Grand Hotel bed.

The new shop-until-you-drop: Shop at Bridgeport Village until you drop into your luxurious Grand Hotel bed.

We’re taking Sunday’s Daylight Savings in stride. Sure, we’ll miss late dinners al fresco, but the early sunsets are just as beautiful. Plus, our shops, museums, and restaurants are using the time change to your advantage with lots of outings meant for after dark.

Shop Nighttime Steals
No matter when you visit, shop by the glow window displays at Bridgeport Village, especially with the nearby Grand Hotel at Bridgeport and its Shopping Package, which includes a $25 gift for evening splurges. After dropping off your haul, illuminate the night with an IMAX show at Regal Bridgeport Village 18.

Science & Stars
Let’s take it to the stars with the OMSI Science Pub Hillsboro: Smashing the “Right Stuff” Fallacy (November 18 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Venetian Theatre & Bistro, $5 suggested). Imagine the sunrise from outer space with other space geeks.

For a different kind of star, consider the poinsettia and its star-shaped leaf pattern at the 13th Annual Evening of Lights (November 7 from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Al’s Garden Center). Celebrate winter’s most festive plant while sipping champagne under twinkle lights.

Museum by Moonlight
The World Forestry Center Discovery Museum is opening its doors after hours for a special Museum by Moonlight: Lumberjacks and Libations (November 21, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., $9, 21-and-over only). The nighttime museum walk (and accompanying cash bar) makes this event the perfect symphony of photography, nature…and lumberjack beards.

Festive Lights for Holiday Nights
Nothing cheers up the night sky more than jaunty little twinkle lights. Luckily, Oregon’s Washington County goes ga-ga for all that glow, glistens, and gleams. See what holiday light events are happening when you come to town:

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Row, Row, Row…Your Pumpkin!

Posted on: September 18th, 2013 by Jackie Luskey No Comments
Submit an entry into the Pumpkin Regatta Mascot Naming Contest.

Submit an entry into the Pumpkin Regatta Mascot Naming Contest.

Some folks jump-start fall by forcing pumpkin-flavored everything into the day-to-day as soon as September hits. We can’t help but jump on the bandwagon ourselves. So, while we’re still a month away from ghouls, ghosts, and gourds, we feel compelled to mention the 10th Annual West Coast Giant Pumpkin Regatta (Saturday, October 19, 2013, 10 a.m. to 4  p.m. at Tualatin Commons).

While a Giant Pumpkin Regatta may sound like a regal affair, this special day veers more to the wonderfully absurd. Pumpkin-lovers come to watch this annual race of 1,000-plus pound hallowed pumpkins—with people inside them—buoying across the water.

Upon trucks hauling giant pumpkins to the race site, the enormous gourds are fork-lifted to sit alongside each other for the 14th Annual Terminator Weigh-Off. Upon declaring a winner (last year’s winning pumpkin weighed a whopping 1,531 pounds!), the pumpkin owners engage in the most epic pumpkin carving session you have ever seen, scooping out seeds by the gallons.

Rather than filling the pumpkins with lights for a jack-o-lantern, the owners instead place themselves inside the hollowed out orange orbs. The regatta offers different races, with some focusing on speed while others are game-oriented. Giddy from the raucous of the Giant Pumpkin Regatta, the crowd moves on to a cornucopia of other activities, including a pie-eating contest, pumpkin decorating, and live music.

Not only do we hope this all has you revving to go, but also ready to submit an entry into the Pumpkin Regatta Mascot Naming Contest. Do it quick because entries must be submitted by this Friday, September 20. The winner of the contest receives a chance to paddle their own pumpkin on the big day—we’d love to root for you!

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A Vintner’s Life for Me on the NW Harvest Trail

Posted on: August 23rd, 2013 by Jackie Luskey No Comments
During the NW Harvest Trail, you'll see wineries in the throes of crush season.

During the NW Harvest Trail, you’ll see wineries in the throes of crush season.

As wine lovers, autumn can’t help but jockey for the position of our favorite season. It is harvest time after all and the thought of freshly de-stemmed grapes being crushed into juice—quite frankly—makes us nearly giddy. Here in Oregon’s Washington County, our winemakers get that and they want to share the harvest season fun with you during the North Willamette Wine Harvest Trail event.

There’s a reason the Today Show ranked the North Willamette Wine Harvest Trail as one of “5 fall festivals worth a trip.” On October 5, 2013, this annual event will once again welcome oenophiles to peer into a vintner’s life from the ground level. Thirsty wine enthusiasts board a chartered bus at 10 a.m., but don’t get too comfortable. The bus will take guests to three wineries at different phases in the vineyard-to-barrel process. You will walk the vineyard, watch demonstrations, work the crush pad, and get insight into the inner workings of a winery.

Of course, it’s not all work and no play. Overlooking the vineyards you’re learning so much about, the day won’t be complete without a wine country lunch. Each vineyard along the way will also feature tastings and nibbles because one of the best ways to learn about wine is to taste it close to the source. Your bus tour guide will answer any lingering questions about how we make such good Pinot.

After a full day of wine making and tasting, a Grand Tasting event is in order at the Tualatin Estate Vineyard. From 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., guests can meet the full gamut of winemakers in the areas with over 25 North Willamette wineries ready to share tastings and appetizers.   

With limited space, register for the Northwest Willamette Harvest Trail soon. Your registration of $95 includes the full day tour. Can’t join us for the full day? No problem. A limited number of Grand Tasting-only tickets are available for $45.  All tickets include tastings from wineries, food pairings, commemorative wine glass and specials on wine.

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We’ve Got the Stuff for the History Buff

Posted on: August 21st, 2013 by Jackie Luskey No Comments
The architecture of the Old Scotch Church helps tell the story of the Oregon Trail's pioneers.

The architecture of the Old Scotch Church helps tell the story of the Oregon Trail’s pioneers.

Oregon’s Washington County is the home of some of today’s pioneer winemakers, farmers, and tech gurus. These innovators are emblematic descendants of the original Oregon Trail pioneers who invigorated our land over a century ago. Whether you’re a history buff or are just looking toward the past in order to see something new, you’ll see that history is alive and well here.

Ice Age
It’s not just about the Oregon Trail here, either. Our inhabitants go way, way back—to the Ice Age! Remnants of life during the Ice Age include an impressive 14,000 year old mastodon tusk and molars, which are displayed near where they were found at the Tualatin Heritage Center.  (The 14,000 year-old skeleton of a mastadon is on display at the Tualatin Library, 18878 SW Martinazzi Ave., Tualatin, OR 97062;  wccls.org/libraries/tualatin; 503-691-3074.)

If you’re hungry for more pre-historic relics, head over to the Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals where you’ll find dinosaur fossils, meteorites, and the largest opal-filled thunder egg in the world.

Oregon Trail
Of course your history-infused visit won’t be complete without some Oregon Trail attractions. See living history with one of the oldest continuously-used churches in Oregon. The Old Scotch Church was built in 1878 by Scottish pioneers (some of whom are buried in the adjacent cemetery). You’ll be so enamored the Pioneer architecture of its eight-sided steeple that you’ll want to see more, which you can at Pacific University’s Old College Hall, the oldest educational building still standing in the western U.S. (See also: “Pioneer Cemeteries of Washington County“)

Old College Hall, built in 1850, is a quintessential example of Pioneer architecture with its octagonal belfry. The building now houses historical artifacts from the university’s colorful history, and the first Wednesday of the month, from 1-4 p.m., visitors are welcomed into the hall’s museum, which glimpses into the Pioneer life that set the foundations for the university.

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Trail of the Week: Tualatin River Water Trail

Posted on: August 19th, 2013 by Jackie Luskey No Comments
Paddling the Tualatin River, you'll see Oregon's Washington County in a whole new way.

Paddling the Tualatin River, you’ll see Oregon’s Washington County in a whole new way.

Every trail has its peak season. Whether it’s catching the autumn change of oak trees or it’s simply the perfect temperature for hitting the trail, we all feel the seasons through the changing nature of the trails we use. Water trails are, of course, no exception. In the last days of summer, feeling the soft splash of the Tualatin River come off of a kayak or canoe oar is nothing short of delightful.

Instead of the usual tromp through the forest, paddle down the Tualatin River Water Trail. To make it easy, the Tualatin Riverkeepers’ affordable kayak and canoe rentals are stationed at Cook Park—but only through Labor Day!

Along the 40 mile stretch of the Tualatin River Water Trail, paddlers can find swimming deer, turtles, eagles, and even otters. Nature lovers can truly unwind and experience wildlife from a new angle.

As the river is a friendly one (and a life jacket is included with your boat rental), The Tualatin River Water Trail is the ideal first experience for new kayakers and canoeists. Simply paddle at your own place and enjoy the easy-breezy style of water trail travel. Kayaks, canoes, and lifejackets are available to rent from the Tualatin Riverkeepers through September 2, 2013. The Tualatin Riverkeepers are located at Cook Park (17005 SW 92nd Avenue, Tualatin, Oregon). Rental hours are Friday through Sundays (and Labor Day), 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Rental rates are $30 per canoe or tandem kayak, $20 per solo kayak. After four hours, there is an additional $10 charge per additional hour of use.

Fast Facts
Length: 40 miles, with various access points    
Type: kayaking, canoeing
Level: beginner
Map: Tualatin Riverkeepers Paddler Map

Tune into the next installment of Trail of the Week! We will be shifting gears, going from paddles to pedals. With the Inaugural Ride for the Tualatin Valley Scenic Bikeway less than a month away, we are thrilled to take some time to talk about how beautiful and fun this ride is. Can’t wait? Register for the Inaugural Ride now.

Did you catch our first Trail of the Week installment? Don’t miss out on the Fanno Creek Trail—it allows you to walk alongside the Tualatin River instead of paddling in it!

Introducing Trail of the Week

Posted on: August 12th, 2013 by Jackie Luskey No Comments
The Ki-a-Kut Bridge leads pedestrians and bicyclists over the Tualatin River.

The Ki-a-Kut Bridge leads pedestrians and bicyclists over the Tualatin River.

Welcome to the official kick off of our Trail of the Week series. We’re constantly amazed by all the ways to enjoy the outdoors here in Oregon’s Washington County. From sporty runs to lackadaisical strolls, take on the trails upon trails and experience the stupendous beauty of the area. And hey, we haven’t forgotten about our cyclists and kayakers. In our book, bike paths and waterways are trails of sorts, too. So let’s get this who on the road—err, I mean trail.

The Fanno Creek Trail  is the type of trail you’ll want to do again and again. In fact, many people do frequent the trail on a regular basis. As the trail meanders through three different cities (Beaverton, Tigard, Tualatin and Durham), walkers and leisure bicyclists are easily elevated Zen moment.

Stroll through a green pasture that takes you into Cook Park. Newbie and seasoned birdwatchers gather to gaze at winged blackbirds, common yellowthroats, blue herons, and waterfowl in the lush wetlands. For those interested in more dainty creatures, just stop by the adjacent Tupling Butterfly Garden, which is satiated with lush flora.

Continuing on, you’ll see how the Tualatin River flows alongside the well-maintained path. Cutting under the trestle on the trail, walkers and bikers can turn left for Durham City Park or right onto the Ki-a-Kuts Bridge. The pedestrian bridge sports a gorgeous view, with moss covered oak trees bouncing their emerald hues off the soft gurgling Tualatin River below.  Upon crossing the bridge, the river floodplain leads into the Tualatin Community Park.

If you head north toward Beaverton and beyond, it’s worth taking at peek at the Fanno Farmhouse, home of the 19th Century onion farmer Augustus Fanno. The picturesque yellow house is as cute as can be. Imagine ol’ farmer Augustus taking in the same beauty as you just did over a hundred years ago.

Fast Facts
Length: 18.6 miles
Type: walking, biking
Level: beginner
GPS coordinates: 45.404, -122.764

Tune in next week! With a smorgasbord of trails—from a bit off the beaten path to more paved and friendly—we can’t wait to show off a new trail in each weekly installment.

Bike your way through Oregon’s Washington County with the Tualatin Valley Scenic Bikeway.

A Mid-Week Tour of Oregon’s Washington County Wine Country

Posted on: November 9th, 2012 by Sylke Neal-Finnegan No Comments

Wine tasting isn’t just for weekends. Several wineries throughout Oregon’s Washington County–located in the northern end of the famed Willamette Valley–are open daily, year-round. On a beautiful autumn weekday, a wine blogger and I set out to experience wine country, and found some surprises along the way.

We started out quite early and arrived at our first stop, Elk Cove Vineyards, at 10:30 a.m. Elk Cove has been family owned and operated since 1977, and today, the second generation is running the winery, and earning applause with its Pinot Noir and other varietals. Our tasting flight included Elk Cove’s highly-rated Pinot Noir, and a selection of whites, such as a late-harvest Riesling. The crisp wines complemented the views of the fog-filled vineyard, which was lit up with the colors of fall: Brilliant yellow, golden orange, deep rust and dark green. (Elk Cove Vineyards is open daily, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; closed some holidays)

Miki's Christmas Shop has the 2nd largest collection of German Smokers (incense burners) for sale in the U.S.

After lunching at 1910 Main — An American Bistro– a cozy restaurant offering modern twists on American comfort foods–we set off for Shafer Vineyard Cellars (established in 1978) and home to Miki’s Christmas Shop.  We took in the breathtaking views of the foothills of Gales Creek Valley, as well as the vineyard, which was ablaze with yellow grape leaves, before entering the quaint tasting room. We were greeted by Miki Shafer, the owner and winemaker, who poured us tastes of her Pinot Noir, Riesling, and special holiday wine, the aptly named Holiday Magic (which, when combined with Shafer’s sparkling wine, makes a spicy, festive drink). Between sips, we ventured into the Christmas Shop, and perused the holiday decor from around the world, including what is the second largest collection of German Smokers in the U.S. (pictured, right). (Shafer Vineyard Cellars is open daily, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; closed on major holidays*)

The next stop was the quaint farmhouse tasting room at David Hill Vineyards & Winery, which boasts some of the oldest vines in the Willamette Valley. With sweeping views of Oregon’s Coast Range, David Hill remains one of the most picturesque wineries in the Willamette Valley, as well as one with one of the most diverse selection of varietals found in the northern valley. In addition to Pinot Noir (including the palate-pleasing BlackJack Pinot Noir, crafted with grapes from the estate’s oldest vines) and slate of whites, such as Pinot Gris, Chardonnay and Riesling, David Hill offers Merlot, Tempranillo, Port and more. (David Hill Vineyards & Winery is open daily, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; closed on major holidays)

Visit the "wild west" at the L-Bar-T Bison Ranch Gift Shop

With a little time to kill, we journeyed to the gift shop at L-Bar-T Bison Ranch to pick up some bison jerky.  We were entertained with the signs warning passersby not to “tease” the wild bison that roam the fenced-off ranch in Forest Grove. As one of the most acclaimed ranches of its kind, it has an old, wild west feel to it, as does its gift shop (pictured, left).

Our final winery stop for the day was Oak Knoll Winery, one of the pioneering wineries in Oregon. Founded in 1970, Oak Knoll started with an “experimental” batch of blackberry wine; today, Oak Knoll produces a diverse variety of wines that appeal to all palates. I started with the 2009 Pinot Gris, which was named one of the “Top 100 Best Buys of 2012″ by Wine Spectator, and followed with the 2010 Rose of Pinot Noir. Oak Knoll’s tasting menu offers an interesting slate of blends and sweet reds not often seen in the northern Willamette Valley: “Toasted Cow Red Vintners Blend,” a blend of Barbera, Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah; “Toasted Cow White Vintners Blend,” a sweet blend of Sauvignon Blanc, Müller Thurgau, Gewürztraminer, Riesling and Pinot Gris; “DEVIANT,” a sweet red billed as a “sweet red revolution”; and “Concord”, made from Concord grapes. (Oak Knoll Winery is open daily at 11 a.m.; closed on major holidays).

If you can’t make it to Washington County wine country during the weekend, plan a weekday to enjoy the warm and these warm and inviting wineries.  Additional wineries that are open daily year-round include:

  • Cooper Mountain Vineyards, the first certified organic, biodynamic winery in the Pacific Northwest (open daily, 12-5 p.m.)
  • Kramer Vineyards, a winery that offers a variety of red and white wines, as well as on-site roasted coffee (open daily, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
  • Montinore Estate, a family-owned, certified organic and biodynamic winery  (open daily, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
  • Plum Hill Vineyards, a small, family-owned winery built on a historical dairy farm (open daily, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; opens at noon on Sundays; closed major holidays)
  • Ponzi Vineyards, one of the pioneering Oregon wineries offering a diverse range of varietals (open daily, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
  • SakéOne, an American owned and operated, premium saké brewery (open daily, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.)

 *Most wineries are closed on the following major holidays: Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, New Year’s Day and Easter.

Experience the Diversity of Oregon’s Washington County

Posted on: March 2nd, 2012 by Sylke Neal-Finnegan No Comments

The Walters Cultural Arts Center is home to many culturally diverse performances.

Did you know that Oregon’s Washington County is the most culturally diverse county in the state? What does that mean for you, the visitor? It means you can experience a range of diverse cultural experiences and festivals, without having to renew your passport or leave the country.

Celebrate the Hindi spring festival, Holi (also known as Festival of Colors) at the Rang Barse ~ Holi Party at the Washington County Fair Complex (March 10; $15 for adults/$10 for children).

Each August, SakéOne (820 Elm St., Forest Grove), an American owned-and-operated saké brewery, hosts a Pacific Rim Festival (August 25; admission $5), celebrating the music, food, art (and saké) of Japan, Hawaii and the Pacific Northwest.

This year marks the second annual International Celebration (July 28, 2012 at the Howard M. Terpenning Recreation Complex, located at the intersection of 158th and Walker Rd.) which celebrates cultures from around the world through song, dance, arts and crafts and more.

Celebrate the luck o’ the Irish year round at the Winona Grange (8340 SW Seneca St.; Tualatin) with the First Friday Live Irish Music and Dance” (the first Friday of each month; $10 for adults/$5 for students and 65+). These monthly events are produced by S and A Irish Entertainment, which also hosts Celtic concerts each month.

The Glenn and Viola Walters Cultural Arts Center, located in downtown Hillsboro, is home to a host of cultural music events. From spoken word events to dance and live music, the center features entertainment from around the world. Coming up is “Sampradaya: Traditions from Temple to Theater,” classical Bharatanatyam dance incorporating chants from ancient scriptures and the music and rhythm of ancient India (7:30 p.m., March 9; $20 in advance/$25 the day of show).

In April, the center will host the Oregon Mandolin Orchestra, which will be performing the music of Italy, including works from venerable composer Raffaele Calace as well as Italian classics, such as Feniculi-Fenicula (7:30 p.m., April 6; $15 in advance/$17 day of show). For a complete list of upcoming events at the Walters Cultural Arts Center, visit their website.

Film buffs may want to check out Joy Theater (11959 SW Pacific Hwy., Tigard), which shows Hindi and South Indian hit films. To learn more about this unique theater, read this blog post from  November 2010.

Finally, visitors can dine on some of the most authentic and exotic food from around the world, without having to leave the country. Beaverton has been praised for its variety of Korean restaurants, boasting some of the most acclaimed spots in the Greater Portland region!  If curry, masala and tandoori are your favorite flavors, try one of the area’s hottest Indian restaurants, also known as some of the best eateries in the area. Oregon’s Washington County also has a German, Mediterranean and Vietnamese restaurants, just to name a few of the many types of cuisine served here.

This is a sampling of the many experiences you can have here in Oregon’s Washington County.  Visit our website or our event calendar, updated weekly, for ideas of places to see, play and eat while visiting.